Red Bull Street Style Logo - © Red Bull GmbH

WHAT IS RED BULL STREET STYLE?

Red Bull Street Style is the world's premier freestyle football tournament. In 2014 the best freestyle footballers from around the globe showed off their extraordinary skills in a series of qualifying competitions around the world. At the World Final in Salvador, Brazil, the very best competitors from more than 40 nations impressed the jury by showing off stunning tricks. Andrew Henderson from the United Kingdom was the men's winner in front of a big – and vocal – crowd, while Melody Donchet of France clinched the women's crown.

In the 2013 edition, Poland's Szymon Skalski and Hungary's Kitti Szasz tricked their way to the men's and women's titles as freestyle footballers from all four corners of the world battled it out in Tokyo, Japan in front of football star Marco Materazzi (ITA). In 2012 Japanese freestyle-soccer hero Tokura won the men's competition while Hungary's Szasz scored her first women's crown in Lecce, Italy. In 2010 the World Final took place in Cape Town (South Africa). Norway's Anders Solum earned the win in front of a huge crowd on the city's famous Grand Parade. South African local hero Kamal Ranchod progressed all the way to the final before having to admit defeat. Stars George Weah of Lebanon and Edgar Davids from the Netherlands presented the trophy to the proud Norwegian winner in front of journalists from over 30 countries.

Wassim Benslimane (ALG) © Dean Treml - Red Bull Content Pool

In 2008 Arnaud "Séan" Garnier was crowned World Freestyle Soccer Champion in São Paulo, Brazil at the inaugural Red Bull Street Style World Final. Participants from 44 countries battled it out head-to-head in the South American footballing mecca for the prestigious title. Edgar Davids (NED), Bebeto (BRA) and futsal champion Falcão (BRA) joined the judging panel.

RED BULL STREET STYLE RULES

Introduction
Red Bull Street Style is a game and global event series that aims to find the best overall freestyle football player in the world. The sport of freestyle truly is FREE and has many styles of player. This format's designed to place equal weight on all sides of the game: the most creative, technical and stylish player will be crowned Red Bull Street Style World Champion.


1. STAGE LAYOUT

Round stage area, 7m/23ft of diameter.
If stage is outdoor following rules related to weather must be applied:
• With snow or rain: Competition suspended
• Wind: Limit of wind is 7.9m/s
• If limit is exceeded, competition's temporarily suspended.

 

2. Ball

Every freestyler can use his own ball – as long as the ball fits in the following dimensions:
• Ball sizes: 4.5 to 6
• Ball weight: 300 grams to 400 grams o Ball pressure: 0.5 to 0.6 bar
• On each ball two Red Bull Street Style stickers will be attached (size approx. 14 x 7 cm). These two stickers need to be on there all the time during the whole event period. Beside the ball manufacture brand and our stickers no other branding is allowed on the ball.

 

3. General Rules

One ball, two athletes, three minutes.
Participation to the competition is open to freestylers older then 15 years.
The format is a head-to-head competition involving two freestylers on stage for a three-minute battle. This means:
• Each 30 seconds, one freestyler has to pass the ball to his/her opponent (each freestyler will have the ball three times during every battle)
• Participants can use only one ball at a time
• Hands are NOT allowed
• Props and objects cannot be integrated into the battles (eg pens, rope, clothing etc)
• Competitors can't leave the stage at any time during the battle
• One participant at a time
• Mocking or insulting the other player is forbidden
• The player on hold (not with the ball) can react to the performance of the competitor, but not disrespectfully
• The athlete must give the ball back to his/her opponent after 30 seconds.

As this is a 'battle' format, the winner of each battle is the one who gets more votes from the judges and proceeds to the next phase.
Judges will pick the winner on overall performance. Judges can ask for one extra round if vote is too close to call.
Appeals against the judges' decision aren't allowed.

Competition is divided into two phases:
1. Group phase: where freestylers compete against all the other members of their respective group (determined by draw)
2. Top 16: a direct elimination phase. If two athletes end the Group Phase with the same quantity of won battles, the tiebreaker criterion to determine their position in the group will be their total quantity of votes.


4. Judges and Judging Criteria

For qualifiers, the judging panel's composed of three freestylers. For the Top 16 and Finals the judging panel's composed of five judges: three to four freestylers and one to two professional football players. Judges analyse the overall performance.

The considerations for battles are:

Creativity/Variety
The winning player must demonstrate a strong level of comfort in all forms of the sport. The judges are looking for a CREATIVE combination of floor and standing tricks, foot, head and body tricks. Innovation and originality are critical to win this element of the game. Repetition in a battle and from one battle to another is not appreciated.

Control/Technical

This is the element for the technical side of the sport. Difficulty, uniqueness and quality of execution are the core ingredients of control. Sloppy, out of control execution will work against the player. "Make it or break it". Use of hands and mistakes are not appreciated.

Style/Energy and Rhythm (we want a SHOW!)

Style is as valuable as creativity and control. Good style appears effortless and smooth. A natural connection with the opponent, crowd and music is important. Stage presence, fun reactions, improvisation and entertainment (having fun) are elements of style.